Skip Global navigation and goto content

It's a New Day in Public Health.

The Florida Department of Health works to protect, promote & improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county & community efforts.

Skip MegaMenu and goto content
Keep calm and be prepared.  Emergency.cdc.gov

Emergency Preparedness and Response

Florida Department of Health - St. Johns County

  •  904-506-6081
  •  

    Mailing Address

    200 San Sebastian View 

     

    Saint Augustine, Florida 32084 


The Florida Department of Health in St. Johns County (DOH–St. Johns) was recognized nationally as a " Project Public Health Ready" certified county health department in 2010 and 2015.

Project Public Health Ready (PPHR) Project Public Health Ready (PPHR) is a national criteria-based public health preparedness program that assesses local health department capacity and capability to plan for, respond to, and recover from public health emergencies.  We stand ready to serve our community in any emergency, such as staffing Special Medical Needs Shelters when tropical storms or wildfires force evacuations, or operating Points of Dispensing or Mass Vaccination clinics to protect the public from disease outbreaks or epidemics.


St. Johns County residents are encouraged to prepare well in advance of disasters. Make a plan for yourself, family members, and pets so that everyone knows what to do in an emergency.  Assemble an Emergency Supply Kit of important papers, supplies, and medications that you will need with you if you have to evacuate your home.  Be Informed before, during, and after a disaster.

St. Johns County Emergency Notification System Link

  • Hurricane Preparedness
  • Hurricane Resources – St. Johns County
  • Prepare for Emergencies: Make a Plan!
  • Carbon Monoxide (CO) and Generator Safety
  • Volunteer Today
  • Additional Resources

Be Prepared This Hurricane Season

St. Johns County residents have experienced many  storms throughout history . When the waves swell, the wind blows, and rain starts to pour you will ask yourself, how prepared or unprepared are you?


Hurricane Season
COVID-19 Update

Preparing for hurricane season can be stressful, and because the 2021 hurricane season comes during the COVID-19 pandemic, it may be especially so.

As hurricane season approaches, listen to local officials on questions related to how you may need to adjust any evacuation plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)  and your local officials.


Hurricane Safety Messages with
American Sign Language (ASL)


  Determine Your Risk

The threats from hurricanes to you and your family can vary widely depending on where you live. It is not just those along the coast that can experience significant, life-threatening impacts. Evaluate what you need to do to protect your home, family, and business NOW.


Develop An Evacuation Plan

Make sure you have a hurricane evacuation plan. The first thing you need to do is find out if you live in a storm surge hurricane evacuation zone or if you are in a home that would be unsafe during a hurricane. During a hurricane evacuation order, St. Johns County mobile home residents must evacuate regardless of their zone. If you are, figure out where you would go and how you would get there if told to evacuate. You do not need to travel hundreds of miles. Identify someone, perhaps a friend or relative who does not live in an evacuation zone or unsafe home, and coordinate with them to use their home as your evacuation destination. Be sure to account for your pets, as most local shelters do not permit them. Put the plan in writing for you and those you care about.

As hurricane season approaches, listen to  local officials on questions related to how you may need to adjust any evacuation plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and your local officials.

Assemble Disaster Supplies

Just having enough supplies to make it through a hurricane is not enough. You need plenty to make it through what could be a LONG recovery period too. Water and electricity could be out for a week or more. Have enough non-perishable food, water and medicine to last each person in your family for a MINIMUM of one week. Also make sure you have extra cash, a battery-powered radio, flashlights, and a portable crank or solar powered USB charger to charge your cell phone. The CDC recommends if you need to go to a public shelter, bring at least two cloth face coverings for each person and, if possible, hand sanitizer. Children under two years old and people having trouble breathing should not wear face coverings.

Build an Emergency Supply Kit with help from www.Ready.gov/kit.

Don't Forget Pets When Preparing

Remember, when preparing for a hurricane what is good for you is good for your pet, so get them ready today. These  Pet Preparedness Tips  can help you to prepare now. Pay attention to local guidance about updated plans for evacuations and shelters, including potential shelters for your pets.

Resources:

Get An Insurance Checkup

Call your insurance company or agent and ask for an insurance checkup to make sure you have enough homeowners insurance to repair or even replace your home. Remember, standard homeowners insurance does not cover flooding. Whether you are a homeowner or renter, you will need a separate Flood Insurance  policy. Visit www.FloodSmart.gov  to get started. Act now as flood insurance requires a 30-day waiting period .

 

Strengthen Your Home

If you plan to ride out the storm in your home, make sure it is in good repair and up to local hurricane building code specifications. Have the proper plywood, steel or aluminum panels to board up the windows and doors. Remember, the garage door is the most vulnerable part of the home, so it must be able to withstand the winds. Follow these tips to prepare Before the Storm.

Help Your Neighbor

Learn about all the different actions you and your neighbors can take to prepare and recover from the hazards associated with hurricanes. Start the conversation now with these Neighbor Helping Neighbor strategies but, remember that you may need to adjust your preparedness plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.

Complete a Written Plan

The time to prepare for a hurricane is before the season begins, when you have the time and are not under pressure. Take the time now to write down your hurricane plan. Know who issues evacuation orders for St. Johns County: Emergency Management, determine locations on where you will seek shelter from the storm, and start to get your supplies ready now. Prepare Your Family Disaster Plan today, visit:

  1. Florida Disaster.org
    Get a Plan!
  2. Family Communications Plan for Kids
    Do you know how to get in touch with your family?
  3. Family Communications Plan for Parents
    Does your family know how to get in touch with each other?
  4. Red Cross
    Make a Disaster Preparedness Plan!
  5. St. Johns County Emergency Management
    View preparedness publications.

Print the St. Johns County
Hurricane Preparedness Guide

Remember, it only takes one storm to change your life and community. For more information on hurricane preparedness in St. Johns County, visit: St. Johns County Emergency Management – Hurricane Preparedness.


Stay Informed this Hurricane Season

Receive alerts about emergencies by signing up for the new

St. Johns County Emergency Notification System:
Alert St. Johns

The Alert St. Johns system will replace the Code  Red notification System, so it is imperative that residents sign up for these critical notifications.

PLEASE NOTE: Some addresses within St. Johns County may not be immediately recognized by the Alert St. Johns system. If yours is one of them, follow the instructions to have your address added manually.

Additional Resources:


Take Care of Mental Health

Dealing with multiple disasters is difficult, but taking care of emotional health helps people think clearly and react to urgent needs. Children may not say how they are feeling during a crisis: Talk to them, answer questions, and make sure they feel loved. 

Need Help?  Know Someone Who Does?
CLICK HERE

View these additional resources about mental health:

Treatment Locator



Additional Resources

The source for portions of this content is the National Weather Service — National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). For more information on hurricane preparedness visit: 


Note: This page contains materials in the Portable Document Format (PDF). The free Adobe Reader may be required to view these files.

St. Johns County Hurricane Preparedness Guide

St. Johns County Hurricane Preparedness Guide

 

Preparedness Braille Toolkit for Blind or Visually Impaired Residents



COVID-19 and Hurricanes Infosheet

COVID-19 & Hurricane Preparedness



Saint Johns County Hurricane Evacuation Zones

St. Johns County Hurricane Evacuation Map PDF



Hurricane Evacuation Route

Evacuation Zone Finder
Search by Address

Note: During a hurricane evacuation order, mobile home residents must evacuate regardless of their zone.



St. Johns County Emergency Management

St. Johns County

Emergency Management



National Hurricane Center


National Hurricane Center

Hurricane and Other Tropical Storm Projected Paths



Florida 511

My Florida 511

Real-time road and traffic information

Connect.Know.Go.



Receive alerts about emergencies by signing up for the

St. Johns County Emergency Notification System
Alert St. Johns

Alert St. Johns - Emergency and Community Notification System for St. Johns County | Opens in a new window

The Alert St. Johns system will replace the Code  Red notification System, so it is imperative that residents sign up for these critical notifications.

PLEASE NOTE: Some addresses within St. Johns County may not be immediately recognized by the Alert St. Johns system. If yours is one of them, follow the instructions to have your address added manually.


More information to help you get prepared is available on the St. Johns County Emergency Management website. This is also where you can register for Special Medical Needs Sheltering and transportation assistance to shelters in emergencies and find maps to the general population, pet friendly, and special needs shelters.

 

The State of Florida Division of Emergency Management provides an interactive online tool, Get a Plan!, to help families and businesses stay prepared. This useful tool allows you to answer a series of questions and create a customized plan. More information to help you get prepared is available on the St. Johns County Emergency Management website. This is also where you can register for Special Medical Needs Sheltering and transportation assistance to shelters in emergencies and find maps to the general population, pet friendly, and special medical needs shelters.

 Plan and Prepare for Emergencies Visit:

Make your plan. Don't wait. Communicate. #BeInformed Ready.gov

Ready.gov

FloridaDisaster.Org

St. Johns County Emergency Management




The Florida Department of Health — Emergency Preparedness and Response Program has valuable information to help you prepare for emergencies:

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) also offers several on-line resources to help citizens prepare for all-hazards. These web-based courses are free of charge and have lots of good information:

CO is an invisible, odorless and tasteless gas that is very poisonous. It can cause Fatigue, weakness, chest pains for people with heart disease, shortness of breath, stomach pain, vomiting, headaches, confusion, lack of coordination, vision problems, loss of consciousness and in severe cases, death.

Florida Poison Information Center

If a person has collapsed or is not breathing, call 9-1-1 immediately. If you suspect CO poisoning, call the Florida Poison Information Center :
1-800-222-1222. 

CDC Highlights

Portable Generators can Produce High Levels of CO Very Quickly

Safety Tips

  • Never use a generator indoors, including homes, garages, basements, crawl spaces and other enclosed or partially enclosed areas, even with ventilation. Opening doors and windows, or using fans will not prevent CO buildup in your home.
  • Always keep portable generators or gasoline engines outside and away from open windows,
    doors, window air conditioners or exhaust vents that could allow CO to come indoors. Follow
    the instructions that come with your unit.
  • Remember, you cannot see or smell CO. If you start to feel sick, dizzy or weak while
    using a generator, get to fresh air immediately.
  • Do not burn charcoal or gas grills inside a house, garage, vehicle, tent or fireplace.

Keep Your Generator
Outside, Away & Dry

Generator
Carbon Monoxide Hazard

CO Alarms Save Lives

  • Install battery-operated CO alarms or plug-in CO alarms with battery backup in your home. Follow the manufacturer’s installation instructions. The CO alarms should be certified to the latest safety standards: UL 2034, IAS 6-96, ASTM D6332, or CSA 6.19.01.
  • Test your CO alarms—follow the manufacturer’s recommendations and replace dead batteries.

Residents interested in volunteering to help during and after public health and medical emergencies may contact DOH–St. Johns Disaster Preparedness and Response Planner.

 Alert St. Johns – Emergency Notification System

Alert Saint Johns. Emergency Notification System

The Alert St. Johns system will replace the Code  Red notification System, so it is imperative that residents sign up for these critical notifications.

PLEASE NOTE: Some addresses within St. Johns County may not be immediately recognized by the Alert St. Johns system. If yours is one of them, follow the instructions to have your address added manually.

 Residents of St. Johns County can be notified of Public safety issues by high-speed telephone emergency notification services. The Alert St. Johns system gives county and city officials the ability to deliver pre-recorded emergency telephone notification/information messages to the entire county or to targeted areas. Officials from the Sheriff’s Office, Emergency Management, St. Johns County Fire Rescue, St. Augustine Police, and St. Augustine Beach Police Department have been trained on the system to ensure all citizens can be informed of any public safety issues.


Additional important resources for disaster planning and preparedness information for individuals, businesses, families, children, and persons with disabilities can be found on these sites:

Make your plan. Don't wait. Communicate. #BeInformed Ready.gov      Florida Division of Blind Services

National Hurricane Center

 

*Note: This page contains materials in the Portable Document Format (PDF). The free Adobe Reader may be required to view these files.